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Friday 22 April 2016

As liberation anniversary approaches a moving personal account of life in Dachau concentration camp is published, supporting ShelterBox
As liberation anniversary approaches a moving personal account of life in Dachau concentration camp is published, supporting ShelterBox


ShelterBox often sees life in the raw - after disasters, in war zones, transit camps and in the plight of refugees. Now the UK charity is set to benefit from sales of a moving personal account of life in a Nazi concentration camp in WW2. It is a remarkable read

June Nathan is a Rotarian from London, and the daughter of the late Ernst Geiduschek.

During Kristallnacht the horrific night of the broken glass on 10 November 1938 when German and Austrian Jews were brutally rounded-up - Ernst Geiduschek was arrested in Vienna alongside 11,000 others and deported to Dachau concentration camp near Munich. Ernst kept a diary of all he saw and endured from the moment of arrest until his release from Dachau, the first and among the worst of the Nazi death camps.

Last year June translated and published her father’s moving account under the title ‘Kristallnacht to Dachau.’ It is an insightful and deeply personal work that shows how the human spirit can endure in the worst of circumstances.

Now, in an act of great generosity, June and the book’s publisher Simone Siemons of Stili Novi in the Netherlands are donating all the proceeds from sales of ‘Kristallnacht to Dachau’ to ShelterBox, the UK-based disaster relief charity.

June knows of ShelterBox through her Rotary connections, and Simone is a volunteer with ShelterBox’s Netherlands affiliate. The translation has been thoroughly checked by professional translator and ShelterBox volunteer, Lucy Kramer.

We read how Ernst Geiduschek survived his treatment at Dachau. His family managed to buy emigration papers for him to England, and he collated his diary in Canada in 1940. June has painstakingly translated her father’s words, opening his story to a UK audience.

29 April every year is a key date, the anniversary of the liberation of Dachau, now 71 years ago. Dachau had various uses after liberation, including as a US military base. Originally an abandoned munitions factory, its dark history under the Nazis is captured powerfully in Ernst’s words. There were 32,000 documented deaths at the camp, and thousands that are undocumented. The Dachau site finally closed in 1960, but it still has poignant religious memorials, and is open to the public.

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